underthesymmetree:

Fibonacci you crazy bastard….

As seen in the solar system (by no ridiculous coincidence), Earth orbits the Sun 8 times in the same period that Venus orbits the Sun 13 times! Drawing a line between Earth & Venus every week results in a spectacular FIVE side symmetry!!

Lets bring up those Fibonacci numbers again: 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34..

So if we imagine planets with Fibonacci orbits, do they create Fibonacci symmetries?!

You bet!! Depicted here is a:

  • 2 sided symmetry (5 orbits x 3 orbits)
  • 3 sided symmetry (8 orbits x 5 orbits)
  • sided symmetry (13 orbits x 8 orbits) - like Earth & Venus
  • sided symmetry (21 orbits x 13 orbits)

I wonder if relationships like this exist somewhere in the universe….

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(via spring-of-mathematics)

Welcome to Digital Revolution from Barbican Centre on Vimeo.

Discover the rise of digital creativity across the arts as Barbican Guest Curator Conrad Bodman, takes us on a tour of our new immersive exhibition, Digital Revolution.

From the history of digital technology to the innovative ways artists - and audiences - are engaging with the digital world, the revolution is starting…

Digital Revolution is open 3 Jul–14 Sep: barbican.org.uk/digitalrevolution #digitalrevolution

iLL BLU FT. JAKE ISAAC “FALL OUT” from scottaltman on Vimeo.

iLL BLU ft. Jake Isaac “Fall Out”
Director: Scott Altman
Producer: Henry Collins
Production Company: Defunct
DoP: Russell Gleeson
Camera Assistant: Dominic Ellis
Stylist: Nina Sobers
Hair & Makeup: Ani Dee
Driver: Wili Ferguson
Talent: Dominant, Georgia Curtis, Eliza Murray, Sem Lee, Bradley Francis, Thomas Tatam
Runners: Courtney Andrews, Lish Udorok
Edit: Yannis Tsakiridis
Colourist: Matt Osborne
Special Thanks: This Is Youth, Supple Nam, Andrea Pfeffer, Niamh McGregor & The Mill London.
Commissioner: Natalia Maus
Label: Island Records
Director Rep: Luti Media

the-actual-universe:

Super Simulator Produces A Virtual UniverseMark Vogelsberger of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics has been collaborating with several scientists and research institutions all around the world to create a simulation software that could produce a virtual universe. The purpose of this project, and others like it, is to see if astronomers can reproduce what we observe in our actual universe."Until now, no single simulation was able to reproduce the universe on both large and small scales simultaneously," said Mark.The simulator, dubbed Illustris, is a very complex program which contains over 100,000 lines of code and the hardware required to run it is no less complex. It had to be spread out over many supercomputers and 8,000 processors, all working in parallel with each other. Researchers said that if such a program were to run on an average home computer or laptop, it would take over two thousand years to complete the simulation.The end result is this image you see here. They began the simulation at 12 million years after the Big Bang and set it in motion within a 350 million light year wide virtual cube. After 3 months of ‘run time’, Illustris created a 13 billion year-old virtual universe, and the results were even more amazing than the fact that the simulator could accomplish this feat at all. Not only did Illustris create a universe that has a cosmic filament type structure like our own universe, it had managed to create over 41,000 galaxies in all different shapes. It created disk, elliptical and irregular galaxies and even galaxy super clusters.The benefit to this type of simulation? Astronomers can use Illustris to view the virtual universe in the same way we observe our own universe in real time, but they can also use it to see things the way they were in the past. For instance, if a galaxy is a billion light years away, then the light we are seeing is showing the galaxy as it was a billion years ago. With Illustris, they can view the galaxy in different times simultaneously."Illustris is like a time machine. We can go forward and backward in time. We can pause the simulation and zoom into a single galaxy or galaxy cluster to see what’s really going on," says co-author Shy Genel of the Ceter for Astrophysics.Along with such a brilliant image, researchers were also able to produce a simulation video to show us the progression of Illustris’ virtual universe, all of which is linked below.-TAZIMAGE CREDIT: Illustris CollaborationSOURCEVIDEO

the-actual-universe:

Super Simulator Produces A Virtual Universe

Mark Vogelsberger of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics has been collaborating with several scientists and research institutions all around the world to create a simulation software that could produce a virtual universe. The purpose of this project, and others like it, is to see if astronomers can reproduce what we observe in our actual universe.

"Until now, no single simulation was able to reproduce the universe on both large and small scales simultaneously," said Mark.

The simulator, dubbed Illustris, is a very complex program which contains over 100,000 lines of code and the hardware required to run it is no less complex. It had to be spread out over many supercomputers and 8,000 processors, all working in parallel with each other. Researchers said that if such a program were to run on an average home computer or laptop, it would take over two thousand years to complete the simulation.

The end result is this image you see here. They began the simulation at 12 million years after the Big Bang and set it in motion within a 350 million light year wide virtual cube. After 3 months of ‘run time’, Illustris created a 13 billion year-old virtual universe, and the results were even more amazing than the fact that the simulator could accomplish this feat at all. Not only did Illustris create a universe that has a cosmic filament type structure like our own universe, it had managed to create over 41,000 galaxies in all different shapes. It created disk, elliptical and irregular galaxies and even galaxy super clusters.

The benefit to this type of simulation? Astronomers can use Illustris to view the virtual universe in the same way we observe our own universe in real time, but they can also use it to see things the way they were in the past. For instance, if a galaxy is a billion light years away, then the light we are seeing is showing the galaxy as it was a billion years ago. With Illustris, they can view the galaxy in different times simultaneously.

"Illustris is like a time machine. We can go forward and backward in time. We can pause the simulation and zoom into a single galaxy or galaxy cluster to see what’s really going on," says co-author Shy Genel of the Ceter for Astrophysics.

Along with such a brilliant image, researchers were also able to produce a simulation video to show us the progression of Illustris’ virtual universe, all of which is linked below.

-TAZ

IMAGE CREDIT: Illustris Collaboration

SOURCE

VIDEO

(Source: facebook.com)